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16 June 2010: New research report concludes that Good Vibrations can help rehabilitate prisoners

A team of researchers from Birmingham City University’s Department for Applied Criminology are publishing a report tomorrow, called Continuing Positive Change, which looks at the long-term impact on Good Vibrations participants.  They have found long-term and positive impacts on prisoners social, emotional and mental wellbeing, and clear links to rehabilitation:

  • Good Vibrations gamelan projects significantly reduce anger levels and improve communication skills and levels of engagement with further education and training
  • The impact of projects has long-term positive effects, even post-release
  • The report highlights the potential for arts-based programmes and more traditional programmes in prisons to complement each other

The research investigated the long-term impact of Good Vibrations on individual prisoners who had completed a Good Vibrations project at least 12 months previously in a number of general prison settings for men and women, as well as at HMP Grendon – which operates as a therapeutic community.  The prisoners were assessed for any possible changes in their emotions and behaviour, based on an emotional scale developed by the research team.  Among various findings, there was clear evidence that the project had strongly helped to improve prison staff/inmate relationships as well as helping to reduce prisoners’ anger levels and increase their openness to wider scopes of learning through improved confidence, enhanced listening and communication skills, tolerance and levels of self-expression.  These results indicate that Good VIbrations courses act as a catalyst for change in the lives of offenders, whether in prison or in the community.

If you’d like to read the full report, please email info@good-vibrations.org.uk