Outline of Javanese leaf with Gamelan room in writing

Playing along

Other instruments

Outline of Javanese leaf with Gamelan room in writing
Outline of Javanese leaf with Gamelan room in writing

Playing along

This page has been formatted for phones, there are more options available on larger devices

If you’ve already tried the balungan page then why not try some other instruments?

The Saron Panerus is a balungan instrument.

It’s also called a Peking

It is in this section as it plays different patterns

In this type of piece, the Saron Panerus plays an echo of the balungan

The bold notes are balungan, the grey notes are the echo

It sounds like this

Please scroll to the bottom of the page for the accompaniment version

In the App click or tap the gong/kempul image and select play

It should now look like this

There are 3 types of instrument in a gong/kempul rack

gong-and-kempul-arrangement

Each instrument has it’s own symbol

In standard notation they are marked like this

Have a listen to how they fit with the balungan

The kempul plays a 6 when the balungan plays 2. It plays a 5 when there is a 5

Please turn on the note guide in the App to find them

Please scroll to the bottom of the page for the accompaniment version

Next we’ll try the kenong and kethuk

In the App click or tap the kenong/kethuk image and select play

It should now look like this

There are 3 types of instrument in a kenong rack

6 kenong with kethuk and kempyang

Kenong-layout-1

Each instrument has it’s own symbol

In standard notation they are marked like this

*There is no kempyang in this style of pice

Have a listen to how they fit with the balungan

The kenong plays a 3 when the balungan plays 3. It plays a 6 when there is a 1 or 6

Please turn on the note guide in the App to find them

Please scroll to the bottom of the page for the accompaniment version

The Bonang Barung has its own set of rules which can be different depending on the style of the piece or the speed it is played

Once you have opened it you will see it has 2 rows of notes

It may help you to spend some time exploring the instrument to get used to it’s layout

If you have had any experience in playing instruments like a xylophone or a piano it may seem that the notes are in an unusual order

You may have noticed that notes are paired opposite each other

This makes it easier to play 2 notes together as you will see in the next section

In a piece like Kandhang Bubrah the Bonang Barung plays a technique named Gembyang

This means the player uses pairs of the same note played together e.g. both the 3s 

Most commonly it uses the notes indicated with the white and grey arrows in this picture

In Kandhang Bubrah the Bonang Barung plays the same notes as the kenong 

It plays ahead of the Balungan and Kenong, leading the players by sending a musical cue to where the balungan notes are going

It plays a pair of 3s (gembyang 3) to lead the group to the 3 (in red) and then a pair of 6s (gembyang 6) to lead the group to the 6 (in red)

Have a listen to how it fits with the balungan

Please scroll to the bottom of the page for the accompaniment version

The Bonang Panerus plays the same notes as the Bonang Barung

It plays ahead of the Balungan and Kenong, leading the players by sending a musical cue to where the balungan notes are going

It plays a pair of 3s (gembyang 3) to lead the group to the 3 (in red) and then a pair of 6s (gembyang 6) to lead the group to the 6 (in red)

It has a different rhythm

Have a listen to how it fits with the balungan

If you’ve already tried the balungan page then why not try some other instruments?

The Saron Panerus is a balungan instrument.

It is in this section as it plays different patterns

In this type of piece, the Saron Panerus plays an echo of the balungan

The bold notes are balungan, the grey notes are the echo

It sounds like this

Please scroll to the bottom of the page for the accompaniment version

In the App click or tap the gong/kempul image and select play

It should now look like this

There are 3 types of instrument in a gong/kempul rack

gong-and-kempul-arrangement

Each instrument has it’s own symbol

gong and kempul symbols for phone

In standard notation they are marked like this

Have a listen to how they fit with the balungan

The kempul plays a 6 when the balungan plays 2

It plays a 5 when there is a 5

Please turn on the note guide in the App to find them

Please scroll to the bottom of the page for the accompaniment version

In the App click or tap the kenong/kethuk image and select play

It should now look like this

There are 3 types of instrument in a kenong rack

6 kenong with kethuk and kempyang

Kenong-layout-1

Each instrument has it’s own symbol

Kenong symbols for phone

In standard notation they are marked like this

*There is no kempyang in this style of pice

Have a listen to how they fit with the balungan

The kenong plays a 3 when the balungan plays 3.

It plays a 6 when there is a 1 or 6

Please turn on the note guide in the App to find them

The Bonang Barung has its own set of rules which can be different depending on the style of the piece or the speed it is played

Once you have opened it you will see it has 2 rows of notes

It may help you to spend some time exploring the instrument to get used to it’s layout

If you have had any experience in playing instruments like a xylophone or a piano it may seem that the notes are in an unusual order

You may have noticed that notes are paired opposite each other

This makes it easier to play 2 notes together as you will see in the next section

In a piece like Kandhang Bubrah the Bonang Barung plays a technique named Gembyang

This means the player uses pairs of the same note played together e.g. both the 3s 

Most commonly it uses the notes indicated with the white and grey arrows in this picture

In Kandhang Bubrah the Bonang Barung plays the same notes as the kenong 

It plays ahead of the Balungan and Kenong, leading the players by sending a musical cue to where the balungan notes are going

It plays a pair of 3s (gembyang 3) to lead the group to the 3 (in red) and then a pair of 6s (gembyang 6) to lead the group to the 6 (in red)

Have a listen to how it fits with the balungan

Please scroll to the bottom of the page for the accompaniment version

This section is still being built

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Photography by Toby Madden/The Independent, Osman Deen/South London Press, Camilla Panufnik, Elspeth Van Der Hole, GDA Design, Gigi Chiying Lam, G. Bland, Alan Bryden, Mark Carlin, Rachel Cherry, Francois Boutemy, Andy Hollingworth, Rebaz Yassin, and Guy Smallman.

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